Market follower: Followers are generally content to play second fiddle. They rarely invest in R & D and tend to wait for market leaders to develop innovative products and subsequently adopt a “me-too” approach. Their market posture is typically neutral. Their strategy is to maintain their market position by maintaining existing customers and capturing a fair share of any new segments. They tend to maintain profits by controlling costs.

Consistent, strategic branding leads to a strong brand equity, which means the added value brought to your company's products or services that allows you to charge more for your brand than what identical, unbranded products command. The most obvious example of this is Coke vs. a generic soda. Because Coca-Cola has built a powerful brand equity, it can charge more for its product--and customers will pay that higher price.


If you want to build a brand that people are loyal to, you need to do one basic thing: Take care of your customers. Give them the little extras that will make them feel special, and don’t be afraid to start a loyalty program that gives your most loyal brand advocates a free cup of coffee, a discount, or even a free month of your service! Everyone loves that something extra!
Blogs are good, but they’re just one tool. A blog should not be your sole marketing strategy. You should have a comprehensive multi-touch marketing plan to get your value proposition in front of your target audience. This can take many forms. You can launch a direct mail campaign, email campaign, host a webinar, sponsor a local event, attend a trade show, attend networking events, cold call prospects, win awards, etc… There are a thousand different ways for you to be noticed. You have to find the best combination of methods for your strategic goals. Data shows that people need to be exposed to a brand at least seven times before they buy. If you simply do one touch and stop, you’re wasting valuable budget dollars and probably wondering why your efforts are not successful.
Made up of strong horizontal and vertical lines, this template kit is equal parts professional and modern. Running some type up along the edges helps you to guide your consumers’ eye around the design, making this template not only modern in appearances, but functional in purpose. The muted filters used over the imagery also help to create a much calmer and softer effect, making sure the ‘modern’ look remains trustworthy, and not too edgy or abrasive.

Know your products. Spend time articulating the benefits of your products in addition to the features. How will they make a difference in someone's life? Why does that matter to your customers? The most effective marketing speaks to the emotions of consumers, and that connection is created when you can articulate the benefit your business provides. 4 Principles of Marketing Strategy | Brian Tracy
It’s pointless investing time or money in developing your brand without first ascertaining what will resonate with your audience, and to understand your customer’s habits, wants and needs it is essential to talk to them, says Matthew Crole Rees, head of marketing at carfused.com, a brand offshoot for confused.com. Knowing your audience is the first and most important task in building a brand.
I can’t tell from your post what things you’ve NOT done, but I imagine you’ve done quite a bit of Nick’s list. As a caveat to others who may be reading this as a small business owner, I’d say that because brand is so integrated in everything you do, if you DON’T pay attention to the brand you WON’T see the sales. In other words, you can’t afford to ignore the brand. For start-ups, that means planning for non-revenue generating work – brand development – before you start seeing sales. We call those investments “table stakes” because it’s what you have to do just to establish your brand, even before the first sale is made. If we could get sales without managing the brand, there’d be no reason to manage the brand. The Ultimate Content Marketing Strategy for 2020

It doesn’t matter how large your brand is today; without authenticity, you won’t be able to build a brand that lasts. Too many brands out there think they have to hype everything, but that isn’t true. Do what you do best. Be clear in your intentions and never use hyperbole to brag about your brand. Nobody likes that feeling that something just ain’t right. Just do you. Your followers will be there.


Creating a strong logo can take a lot of effort and expense because it’s typically a very emotionally charged conversation for a small business owner/executive. I’m not sure that it has to be. If you’re working with a professional designer, with a lot of proven experience, you should be in good hands. Let them do their work. When you try to work too much into a logo you usually lose effectiveness. A logo isn’t meant to tell your entire corporate story, it’s meant to be mark that can be easily identified with you – something that will be remembered. And to be remembered, it has to be used frequently and appropriately.
I’m not sure if a logo needs to be emotive. Most of the big brand logos that I can think of are not (Nike, Starbucks, McDonalds, GE, IBM, Adobe, GM, VW, etc…). There are personal emotions associated with each brand built from conversations with friends, company reps, etc… Those emotions can vary widely among groups. But if you were just exposed to their logo without any previous brand perception, their logo wouldn’t elicit an emotional response. I’d love to hear your take. Daymond John - Branding Your Business
When an employee works for a strongly branded company and truly stands behind the brand, they will be more satisfied with their job and have a higher degree of pride in the work that they do. Working for a brand that is reputable and help in high regard amongst the public makes working for that company more enjoyable and fulfilling. Having a branded office, which can often help employees feel more satisfied and have a sense of belonging to the company, can be achieved through using promotional merchandise for your desktop. How to Build Your Brand, Think Bigger and Develop Self Awareness — Gary Vaynerchuk Interview
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