By no means am I saying that your examples are good logos. The companies you mention are brand masters, no doubt about it, and I fully agree that a logo is part of a brand. Some of them have poor logos because a redesign would be damaging, as you well know. In fact I think the logos of IBM, VW, GM and others you mention are horrible. Particularly that of Starbucks – I don’t know what they were thinking. Speaking of the Starbucks logo however, the two-tailed mermaid was used to signify a seductiveness, and there’s your emotive aspect. It might not work, but it’s there.

Realize that you’re not in control of your brand. That’s right, you only set the direction for your brand. Your actual brand image is determined by your audience. You can use these tips to ensure alignment between your desired brand image and your actual brand image in the minds of your customers. Branding isn’t a one shot deal, it’s an on-going juggling act of marketing, research and conversation. If you’re not tapping into those conversations with your audience, how do you know what their real impression of you is? How will you know how to address it? Brand growth comes from alignment. You have to ensure that your actions, stationary, website and marketing efforts put out the right image. But you cannot stop there; Those are pre-sales activities that get you noticed and hopefully bought. You also have to ensure that all actions and engagements during the sale and post-sale are positive and in line with your desired brand image. If your audience has a different view of you than you’d like, then you need help. And it’s probably best to bring in an outside perspective. The Difference Between Marketing and Branding?

Market challenger: The market challenger holds the second highest market share in the category, following closely behind the dominant player. Their market posture is generally offensive because they have less to lose and more to gain by taking risks. They will compete head to head with the market leader in an effort to grow market share. Their overall strategy is to gain market share through product, packaging and service innovations; new market development and redefinition of the to broaden its scope and their position within it. #AskGaryVee Episode 30: How to Pick a Name for Your Business
As we know from interactions with our own friends, they can be full of surprises. So one of the biggest mistakes you can make when creating a buyer persona is to constantly make assumptions. Actually put these personas to the test, hit the pavement, and start interviewing people and get some real data. After all, there’s that saying about assumptions making a donkey out of you and me.
The colour blue, particularly navy blue, is thought to signal trustworthiness, intelligence and stability. So, what better template to use for your corporate or professional business than this one? This kit combines thin typefaces with heavier ones to make a strong contrast against the dark blue, creating a sharp, clean and polished effect, certain to grab attention. So, if you’re looking to reflect your company’s professionalism and trustworthiness, you can definitely place your trust in this template.
The colour blue, particularly navy blue, is thought to signal trustworthiness, intelligence and stability. So, what better template to use for your corporate or professional business than this one? This kit combines thin typefaces with heavier ones to make a strong contrast against the dark blue, creating a sharp, clean and polished effect, certain to grab attention. So, if you’re looking to reflect your company’s professionalism and trustworthiness, you can definitely place your trust in this template.

I like to use Open Site Explorer as a way to check out what my competitors are doing with their SEO. Moz allows you to find out what external links your competitors are getting. This can give you incredibly valuable insight as to what their content strategy is like, or if they even have one in the first place, and potentially where they’re advertising online.
Starting with a good logo can only be a good thing. The fact that someone has the common sense to ‘do it right’ out of the gate has at least a bit of the common sense to build a foundation for an eventual ‘design language’. By language, I mean the Brand. Consistency, repitition, messaging, etc. — all the things you mention become a business’s personality which, when combined with all interactions/transactions the business performs, ultimately become the customer experience and/or Brand. It’s what the customer remembers. It’s what decides whether or not they will do business with you again.
This book is described as “The cult classic that revolutionized marketing by teaching businesses that you’re either remarkable or invisible.” Instead of following traditional, boring branding methods, Seth Godin pushes the reader to create something extraordinary that everyone will talk about. Purple Cow challenges business owners to adopt new marketing strategies and to “put a Purple Cow into everything you build” in order to set your brand apart. The book discusses successful brands such as Starbucks and Apple and has been translated into 36 languages.

I’m not sure if a logo needs to be emotive. Most of the big brand logos that I can think of are not (Nike, Starbucks, McDonalds, GE, IBM, Adobe, GM, VW, etc…). There are personal emotions associated with each brand built from conversations with friends, company reps, etc… Those emotions can vary widely among groups. But if you were just exposed to their logo without any previous brand perception, their logo wouldn’t elicit an emotional response. I’d love to hear your take. Daymond John - Branding Your Business
Are you looking for a playful, fun and creative design that’s also functional? Well, with its charming colour palette and strong use of type, this template might be just for you. Using a heavy typeface that contrasts beautifully against the deep purple backgrounds, allows for the most important bits of information to be highlighted and made incredibly easy to read, helping you get your message across in an instant. branding 101, understanding branding basics and fundamentals
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