During the 1990s, the resource-based view (also known as the resource-advantage theory) of the firm became the dominant paradigm. It is an inter-disciplinary approach that represents a substantial shift in thinking.[73] It focuses attention on an organisation's internal resources as a means of organising processes and obtaining a competitive advantage. The resource-based view suggests that organisations must develop unique, firm-specific core competencies that will allow them to outperform competitors by doing things differently and in a superior manner.[74] There is No Luck. Only Good Marketing. | Franz Schrepf | TEDxAUCollege

I know it’s an older post Nick, but it’s extremely relevant still today. We realized that the most important driving force out there is .. people.. as you outlined in your last tip. I was working with a company, and we went so far as to change our motto to “People First.” just because of that aspect. Great post. I’d say you should update it, but there isn’t much to add besides social media aspects. Branding Your Personal Brand / Creative Business | Build a Strong, Cohesive Brand Identity
Market leader: The market leader dominates the market by objective measure of market share. Their overall posture is defensive because they have more to lose. Their objectives are to reinforce their prominent position through the use of PR to develop corporate image and to block competitors brand for brand, matching distribution through tactics such as the use of “fighting” brands, pre-emptive strikes, use of regulation to block competitors and even to spread rumours about competitors. Market leaders may adopt unconventional or unexpected approaches to building growth and their tactical responses are likely to include: product proliferation; diversification; multi-branding; erecting barriers to entry; vertical and horizontal integration and corporate acquisitions.
Barney stated that for resources to hold potential as sources of sustainable competitive advantage, they should be valuable, rare and imperfectly imitable.[75] A key insight arising from the resource-based view is that not all resources are of equal importance nor possess the potential to become a source of sustainable competitive advantage.[73] The sustainability of any competitive advantage depends on the extent to which resources can be imitated or substituted.[6] Barney and others point out that understanding the causal relationship between the sources of advantage and successful strategies can be very difficult in practice.[75] Barney uses the term "causally ambiguous" which he describes as a situation when "the link between the resources controlled by the firm and the firm's sustained competitive advantage is not understood or understood only very imperfectly." Thus, a great deal of managerial effort must be invested in identifying, understanding and classifying core competencies. In addition, management must invest in organisational learning to develop and maintain key resources and competencies.
Sunil…congratulations on being a small business owner. Your site is beautiful. If you can successfully carry that look and feel throughout your organization, you’re going to be way ahead of your competition. I am worried, however, about one comment: you wrote “its tough to do everything AND sell your product at the same time.” Doing everything is what sells your product. (Don’t confuse that with being all things to all people:)) That’s what often keeps businesses from being successful…they seperate sales and brand, as if they aren’t related. 13 Tips On Entrepreneurship, Marketing & Branding By Daymond John | Advice For Small Businesses

This kit blends a professional-looking design with calming colours and elements. If you’re searching about for a design that is equal parts inspiring and trustworthy, have a go with this template. By pairing some simple, clean-cut typefaces and a wistful image, coloured to fit your brand, this template kit creates a trustworthy design that combines professionalism with a little heart and dreaminess. Halo Effect - Nike Marketing Strategy
A carefully-cultivated marketing strategy should be fundamentally rooted in a company’s value proposition, which summarizes the competitive advantage a company holds over rival businesses. For example, Walmart is widely known as a discount retailer with “everyday low prices,” whose business operations and marketing efforts revolve around that idea.
Strategic planning typically begins with a scan of the business environment, both internal and external, this includes understanding strategic constraints.[54] An understanding of the external operating environment, including political, economic, social and technological which includes demographic and cultural aspects, is necessary for the identification of business opportunities and threats.[55] This analysis is called PEST; an acronym for Political, Economic, Social and Technological. A number of variants of the PEST analysis can be identified in literature, including: PESTLE analysis (Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Legal and Environmental); STEEPLE (adds ethics); STEEPLED (adds demographics) and STEER (adds regulatory).[56]
Market follower: Followers are generally content to play second fiddle. They rarely invest in R & D and tend to wait for market leaders to develop innovative products and subsequently adopt a “me-too” approach. Their market posture is typically neutral. Their strategy is to maintain their market position by maintaining existing customers and capturing a fair share of any new segments. They tend to maintain profits by controlling costs. How to develop an effective marketing strategy
Are you looking for a playful, fun and creative design that’s also functional? Well, with its charming colour palette and strong use of type, this template might be just for you. Using a heavy typeface that contrasts beautifully against the deep purple backgrounds, allows for the most important bits of information to be highlighted and made incredibly easy to read, helping you get your message across in an instant. branding 101, understanding branding basics and fundamentals
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